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At the behest of edwardspoonhands, it is ReviewsdayTuesday.
*a disclaimer* I am not a book critic or an English major, and so I will not be using words like “tour de force”, “superb achievement”, or “original and affecting”. But I am a college student and lover of books and so I will use words including, but not limited to: “plot”, “point of view”, and “feels”.
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is a book about a boy with autism, who solves a murder. It is written from the point of view of the boy, this makes is what makes this novel phenomenal for me. Chris (the boy) likes prime numbers, and doesn’t understand emotions beyond the basic happy and sad. All this happens around a plot-line that kept me engaged and kept my eyes skipping down the page to catch a glimpse of what would happen next. As I was reading, I started to wonder if maybe I had autism because I understood Chris and his thoughts so well. But then I realized that the author is simply so good at conveying those thoughts and processes that I seamlessly slipped from my world into his. So this book is more than just a story; it is a tinted window that allows me to see another world through another’s eyes. Most books do this, but rarely do I see a book that creates that window with this proficiency. Extra props for the mathematical proof in the back. I like mathematical proofs

At the behest of edwardspoonhands, it is ReviewsdayTuesday.

*a disclaimer* I am not a book critic or an English major, and so I will not be using words like “tour de force”, “superb achievement”, or “original and affecting”. But I am a college student and lover of books and so I will use words including, but not limited to: “plot”, “point of view”, and “feels”.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is a book about a boy with autism, who solves a murder. It is written from the point of view of the boy, this makes is what makes this novel phenomenal for me. Chris (the boy) likes prime numbers, and doesn’t understand emotions beyond the basic happy and sad. All this happens around a plot-line that kept me engaged and kept my eyes skipping down the page to catch a glimpse of what would happen next. As I was reading, I started to wonder if maybe I had autism because I understood Chris and his thoughts so well. But then I realized that the author is simply so good at conveying those thoughts and processes that I seamlessly slipped from my world into his. So this book is more than just a story; it is a tinted window that allows me to see another world through another’s eyes. Most books do this, but rarely do I see a book that creates that window with this proficiency. Extra props for the mathematical proof in the back. I like mathematical proofs

 
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